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Blue fungus in a new light

Researchers at the University of Jena decipher molecular mechanisms that give the blue bark fungus Terana caerulea. The blue bark fungus Terana caerulea grows on tree trunks and branches of deciduous trees and is characterized by its intense cobalt blue color. The class of substances from which this blue color is derived is common in many species of fungi. It enables fungi to produce bioactive substances that degrade deadwood and through which they interact with their microbial environment. Researchers from the Balance of the Microverse Cluster of Excellence at Friedrich Schiller University in Jena have now taken a closer look at how the fungus produces this blue substance and found that one…

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Award for outstanding scientific achievements in light microscopy

Christian Eggeling wins award for his development of a new kind of optical microscopy technique to i…

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New “centre of gravity” for excellent research in microbiology

Groundbreaking ceremony for the new research building of the “Balance of the Microverse” Cluster of …

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Candida albicans hyphae on intestinal epithelial cells

Fragile balance in the gut

Intestinal cells and lactic acid bacteria work together to protect against Candida infections The pr…

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Machine Learning Model to predict potential NAFLD. Source: Howell Leung/ Leibniz-HKI

The gut microbiome as a health compass

The human microbiome can provide information on whether there is a risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver…

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The microscope image shows an amoeba killed by the bacteria. Source: Ruchira Mukherji / Leibniz-HKI

PNAS Cozzarelli Prize 2021 for paper on bacterial cooperation

Bacteria can defend themselves against predators by cooperating with each other. The team from Paleo…

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Amelia Barber, Junior Research Group Leader. Source: Anna Schroll/Leibniz HKI

The world of fungi: Amelia Barber new head of Junior Research Group Fungal Informatics

Dr. Amelia Barber has recently been appointed head of the junior research group “Fungal Informatics”…

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Falk Hillmann has been Professor of Biochemistry/Biotechnology at Wismar University of Applied Sciences since April 1. Quelle: Ronja Münch / Leibniz-HKI

The amoebae whisperer: Falk Hillmann appointed to professorship

As of April 1st, 2022, Falk Hillmann is the new professor of biochemistry/biotechnology at Wismar Un…

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Hyphae of Candida albicans invade human epithelial cells. Source: Ricardo Almeida / Leibniz-HKI

Candidalysin fuels inflammatory bowel disease

Individual Candida albicans yeast strains in the human gut are as different from each other as the h…

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Microverse Newsletter

Upcoming Events

End of Year Celebration

We will be celebrating another year of collaborative successes on Monday December 12th from 13:00 - 15:30. The program in under develoment, but rest assured, festive snacks are part of the plan. More info to come soon!

Podcast

Microbial balance is crucial for a healthy life - whether in humans, animals or plants. Even waters and soils, and thus entire ecosystems, depend on it. If this dynamic balance of bacteria, fungi and other microorganisms falters, the consequences can be severe.

Research into the Microverse is all about the communication and interaction of these tiny organisms with each other and with their environment. This is because they have often been living together for millions of years and are rarely found in isolation.

Prof. Brakhage explains that the next antibiotic agent may be waiting to be discovered in our front yard. And from this, in the best case, a drug can be developed that specifically attacks undesirable microorganisms and does not affect the beneficial ones.

Mikrobiome - Mikroorganismen im (Un-)Gleichgewicht

Microbial Kitchen

Microorganisms like bacteria and fungi have a big influence on our lives. Often they appear to us as threats to our health but that is only a very narrow view on the functions and abilities of microorganisms. In fact, life would not be possible without them: a balanced microbiome keeps humans, animals, plants and ecosystems healthy. Moreover they are significant for our nutrition – humans have been using microorganisms such as yeast or lactic acid bacteria to produce food for thousands of years.

Members and friends of the Microverse Cluster and the Jena School for Microbial Communication have revealed their favourite delicious recipes which involve the activity of microorganisms. You will also find information on typical microorganisms used for food production.

Discover the Microverse and enjoy the microbial kitchen!